A Memory of Might and Power on Cox Plate Day, 1998.

Might and Power: what a great horse! One of John Harms’s favourites. Here he tells the story of the 1998 Cox Plate.

Play On (includes Loose Men Everywhere)

Play On is the omnibus edition of John Harms’s first three books: Loose Men Everywhere, Memoirs of a Mug Punter, and Confessions of a Thirteenth Man. Read what the critics have said about them here. And copies are available through the Almanac Shop.

Get all your Christmas Shopping Done in our Book Sale! (Extended until Tuesday night)

Make The Footy Almanac your one stop Christmas shop this festive season by getting the sports fans in your life some of our great titles while they are at great prices! All book sales include FREE shipping in Australia.

Almanac Sports Memoir: Can you recommend any?

Yvette Wroby looks at some recent footy memoirs as she prepares for her gig at the Williamstown Literary Festival.

Living Footy at Williamstown Literary Festival

The Footy Almanac will be at Willy Lit Fest this year. Come along to see John Harms, Yvetter Wroby and Kerrie Soraghan talking about their love and obsession with footy. Come along for a what will be a delightful session.

Luke Beveridge, the Bulldogs faithful, and Play On

Footy means so much to so many. Just ask a Doggies supporter. In his book Play On (from the Loose Men Everywhere section) John Harms considered why. Luke Beveridge read an extract from Play On at the club celebrations last night. Here’s what the much-loved coach read.

ASSH big bumper night of footy by Les Everett

Monday 10 October the Australian Society for Sports History (WA) is putting on a big bumper night of footy at the The Game Sports Bar in Northbridge.

Bouncedown is at 6.30pm, includes the ultimate footy journeyman and the WA launch of Play On: The hidden history of women’s Australian Rules football

Father’s Day Book Ideas

Get your Father’s Day books here.
Life as I know it.
Play On.
My Lifelong love affair with the Swans

End of financial year book sale including the daily double

Buy one of the books on offer and get a copy of The Footy Almanac for free.

Or for a short time you can get three Footy Almanacs (any editions) for $40.

Memoir: Northerly, North Adelaide and The Bloke With The Talking Shirt

Nado Lenkic, who calls himself Northerly in some Almanac communications, recently sent an email to John Harms. Although it was never intended for publication, JTH asked if he could publish it, as the note is a classic expression of how people engage in all things sport. No wonder Nado was chasing a copy of Play On. [At Uni he was known as The Bloke With The Talking Shirt.]

Opening lines of Loose Men Everywhere

People always say I have a deep prejudice against Hawthorn – even a deep hatred. That always makes me laugh. I have the deepest respect for the mighty Hawks, so much so that they are the very first club to be mentioned in Loose Men Everywhere (soon to be re-published). You can order your copy through our crowdfunding campaign.

Harmes and Harms: a story of golf, industrial relations, bacon and egg burgers and VFL premierships

John Harms remembers how an E Harmes and an E-less Harms spent the 1979 Grand Final. [Memorable – Ed]

Play On returns

John Harms’s omnibus Play On – made up of Confessions of a Thirteenth Man, Memoirs of a Mug Punter and Loose Men Everywhere – has been out of print for nearly a decade. Recent (unlikely) events have motivated him to right that situation, so that Play On will soon be available again. Here’s the story. And how you can buy the book and support the Almanac at the same time – it’s available through our Pozible crowdfunding campaign.

Kick-to-kick (from Loose Men Everywhere)

Recently Paul Daffey pointed Age readers in the direction of the kick-to-kick passage in Richard Flanagan’s The Narrow Road to the Deep North, suggesting kick-to-kick had rarely been written about. He’s right, although it seems the Almanac is home to a number of writers (like Vin Maskell) who have. Here’s a snippet from Loose Men Everywhere by John Harms published in 2002. [E. Regnans alerted Almanac readers to the Flanagan excerpt when it was first published – Ed).