Almanac Elections: The polling booth near the cricket ground

Elections are front and centre which reminds us of this yarn from Roger Lowrey, first published around election time 2019:

Dog legs, racing, cold beer and fraternising with the enemy were all part of Roger Lowrey’s stint while handing out how to vote cards during the SA State Elections in 1985.

Where is my smiling Shrek now?

The positivity that always permeates the thoughts of Jan Courtin has disappeared, hopefully only temporarily. Even Shrek has gone missing! Jan laments and despairs over the implications of the death of one man in the USA.

Almanac Literary – ‘Moratorium’ by Neil Anderson: An extract

‘Moratorium’ is a recently written play by Neil Anderson reflecting times of civil unrest, the Vietnam War and conscription during the 70s. Neil has provided a sampler from Scene 1 of his play.

Sports Rorts II – A case of very bad politics not good policy

Greg Blood has contributed to the national conversation on sports policy for decades and here he delves deeply into the most recent Sports Rorts saga.

On Fires and Fairness

In his thought-provoking article, Edward P. Olsen wrestles with the emotion and angst provoked by the recent bushfires, wondering about the fairness for those affected, and the dilemmas confronting those wishing to make appropriate responses.

Letter of reply to Paddy Grindlay’s “Black Summer”

From a position of scientific qualification, knowledge and expertise, David Wilson presents his point of view on climate change, with the intelligence, authority and passion of one educated with the facts, to offer his support for Paddy Grindlay’s “Black Summer”. [Fantastic ER! Eds]

Almanac Mongolian Life: Four minutes which changed a nation

Mongolia was in the deep throes of a political crisis in 2008. Max Wiggins deftly describes the impact that Neidan Tuvshinbayar’s maiden Olympic gold medal for his country in judo healed all tensions for the developing nation. [Great to have you back Max – Ed]

Confessions of a Disloyal Almanacker

Peter Fuller returns to the Almanac’s pages by sharing a contemplation of this year’s ups and (mostly) downs, especially for Carlton fans. But amid the clouds there are also silver linings. (Welcome back, Peter – Eds.)

Bob Hawke

Rod Oaten with some thoughts on Bob Hawke.

RIP Hawkie – The Punter’s Pal

Bob Hawke was the greatest Australian of Peter Baulderstone’s lifetime. He reminisces about Canberra politics in the 1980’s and the great man’s love of sport and people. Hawke’s prodigious achievements and his all too human failings made most Australians fall in love with him. (Share your memories of Hawke the man, politician and sports lover – Ed.)

Almanac Teams: Another Political Football Representative Team

Mark Duffett with a poll to get everyone engaged in the (s)election process. 3 votes will get you nowhere in this side, it’s all about who can gather the most 1%ers (all 50 + 1 of them).

Fitzroy Football Club event – lunch with Barrie Cassidy and Ged Kearney (July 14)

Next weekend sees Fitzroy FC host Barrie Cassidy and Ged Kearney for their annual ‘Political Football’ lunch.

Richard Flanagan: ‘Our politics is a dreadful black comedy’ – National Press Club speech in The Guardian

Australian author Richard Flanagan addressed the National Press Club as part of the Canberra Writers Festival.

Almanac Books: Empathy, Race and Australia Day – thoughts based on A Rightful Place, edited by Shireen Morris, & Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race, by Reni Eddo-Lodge.  

Jack Banister responds to the discussions which make up Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge and A Rightful Place: A Roadmap to Recognition by various authors. His review essay is timely. [These are books 3 and 4 in Jack’s 52 book odyssey]

Summer – Quiet, Reading, Silence

Jack Banister’s been thinking a lot about silence, and its been shaping his summer reading list.

Hail to the Chief

Peter Baulderstone has found some leaked tapes from the Oval Office. But he’s not sure which one.

The Week: 7/7 – 14/7 – How did this happen?

This is the week that was, a bit of this, a bit of that, according to Almanacker JB.